Uncaged Anthology

Good morning! I won’t bury the lead: I edited a few of the adventures featured in Uncaged Anthology, which is available today over at the DM’s Guild!

I was lucky enough to see this project come into existence in real time on Twitter. It started as a question posed by Ashley Warren about a series of mythology-based one-shots. The response was amazing, and Ashley took the wheel and brought the massive ship that is any anthology project onto an even keel, and it was underway. When the call went out for editors I eagerly put my name in, and was lucky to be asked to take on some of the adventures.

I only grabbed my copy this morning, so expect an in-depth review later. But if the two adventures I work on were any indication of the overall quality (and I have every reason to believe it is so), you will want to grab this book post haste. It is a beautiful book packed with one-shot D&D adventures which could be dropped with ease into your campaign. Given the mythological theme which binds them, they could even form the basis of a campaign, as your players explore the myths and legends of your world.

I’m really excited to read this and get some of these adventures on the table. Even more exciting, this is only Volume One, so expect even more adventures to come!

Once you’ve had a chance to pick up a copy and look it over, I hope you’ll stop by and let me know which are your favourites. And should you be looking for an editor for your TTRPG project, well, I have a page about that. Let’s talk!

At The Rat Hole

Over at The Rat Hole today, I revisit a project I started and stalled on, and have now started again. It’s time to turn my game room into a proper, comfortable game space. If you have a gaming space in your home, you might find some tips and tricks helpful as the series progresses.

Tomorrow I’ll have a thrilling announcement regarding a project I worked on recently, so stay tuned!

RPG Blog Carnival: Making Deities

This month’s RPG Blog Carnival topic is Divine Worldbuilding, which comes at a fortuitous moment as I have had to begin designing a pantheon or two for my home campaign. I really should have given it thought much sooner, as I have two clerics and a paladin split across two groups. When it was just my home game, and I wasn’t looking at publishing the setting, I was fine hand-waiving the details and going with the gods as presented in the 5e PHB. But as I am going to publish this campaign world as a setting book, it seemed appropriate to make some decisions about the deities of my world. Not only is it better to do it now, before the characters get much higher in level, but these details can then inform and even form the basis of future plots.

Today I’m going to outline the first three big questions I ask when creating a pantheon from scratch, so you can see how you might get started. In articles later this month I’ll outline the next steps from there, and we’ll look at one of my finished pantheons, to give you an example of how to flesh out the pantheon for play. Let’s start!

1) Deities of What? – This question encompasses a bunch of more specific questions. In our own history, we can see that deities came into being to help explain aspects of the world we didn’t understand. So the usual starting place would be to look at the elemental forces of your world: fire, lightning, wind, water, and so on. Are there moons in your night sky? There’s probably a deity or deities associated with them. Is there an especially tall mountain, or an always smoldering volcano? Deity. Deities were also associated with common aspects of life which could be affected by unknowable or poorly understood influences. Thus we had deities of the hunt, for instance, because we needed someone to thank/blame when hunting was good/bad. When we later developed agriculture we had a deity for that, for much the same reason. Death deities are probably the most common across pantheons, as death and what happens when we die is probably the great unknowable.

Once you have a list of “primordial” deities, look at your campaign world and figure out where you are in your campaign’s history. If you’re running a campaign set in a rough, pre-history type setting, you might actually be done. But if the societies in your campaign world are more developed, chances are they’ve also expanded the influence and portfolios of their deities. That old deity of fire, for instance, may also be the new deity of the forge. Depending on the flavor of Death deity in your campaign, maybe its portfolio has expanded to include law and judgement in the mortal realm, as well as the hereafter. You may even need to create more modern deities. Early civilizations wouldn’t have needed a Deity of Trade or a Deity of Invention, for instance, but your current culture might.

And one final question, are you going to use a pantheon or not? While there may have once been primordial deities worshipped, perhaps there is now just a single deity encompassing all things to all people. But is it a true monotheism, or do folks also believe in lesser deities which support the main deity? The Catholic faith is a good example of this; while it is considered monotheistic (God), there is the Holy Trinity (Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit), as well as what amounts to a pantheon of Saints, each a patron of some aspect of the world.

2) How do They Look? – This may seem superficial, but it can be an important question to answer because it will determine a lot about the visual aspects of faith in your world. Just think about how much art has been created or influenced by our world’s religions. As before, this question holds many more. Do the deities appear as paragons of the people who worship them? Do they appear gendered or non-gendered? Are they simply anthropomorphisms of the aspect they represent (ie, the Deity of Fire appears as a column of flame to their worshippers, the Moon Deity appears as a bright moon beam striking the ground or altar)? Do they appear at all? Maybe the deities in your campaign world are formless, and there are no direct representations of them.

As part of this, ask yourself if folks are even allowed to show representations of the deities. Maybe images of them are restricted in some way, or even forbidden. Perhaps the opposite is true, and everyone has their own personal idea of what their deity looks like, all equally valid. And does the deity in question have opinions on all this, or does it remain aloof on the question of its appearance?

The answers to these questions will inform aspects of your campaign world like: what do holy symbols look like? How are temples constructed and decorated? How do the clergy (and therefore your clerics, paladins, druids, and sometime warlocks) dress, both for everyday and for adventuring or battle? Can you tell the worshippers of one deity from another, simply by looking at them? Do any of the faiths engage in tattooing, branding, or scarification?

3) Who Worships Them? – The faithful, of course! But who is that? Is the deity species specific, and do they only allow worshippers from that species, or can anyone pay homage? Is the deity gender-specific? Is there a test to join the faithful, some aspect in which a potential worshipper must prove themselves to be a paragon? Or maybe you don’t choose the deity, the deity chooses you, and you can only be one of the “true faithful” if you have received a direct invitation from that deity.

And an even bigger question to answer: are the Deity and the Church on the same page? The Church may have some ideas about who can worship and who is truly faithful, divorced from the Deity in question. If so, what does that look like? Are ceremonies to that deity antagonistic, bordering on blackmail (“Look at this juicy faith we have for you! Give us spells and you can have it!”)? Does the deity sneak around behind the backs of the “True Faithful”, bringing those the Church considers unworthy into the faith? Maybe the situation is so antagonistic, ceremonies look very much like we’d imagine the summoning of a demon would, with the worshipper weaving protections and bindings to force power from the deity.

These three questions, and the little questions buried inside, allow you to piece together a framework for your deities. You can do this for each of the species in your world (and thus have human, dwarf, elf, etc pantheons) or do it once for all. Once you’ve put together this framework you can start adding to it, fleshing out the details for each deity. And that’s where we’ll pick up in the next article.

How do you go about creating the deities for your campaign? Comment below!

Welcome to 2019!

Bit late to the party, I’ll admit, but welcome to 2019 everyone! This past year was…interesting. Definitely low points, some personal, some societal. On both fronts, though, 2019 seems to offer hope, so I choose to focus on that.

You’ll start to notice some small changes around the site in the coming weeks and months. I’m committing myself to a three post a week schedule, which will shake out to be a post over at The Rat Hole on Mondays, with two posts here either W/F or Th/Sa. I’m a happier Renaissance Gamer when I’m writing, so I’ve made time for myself to do that every day.

Two new projects are starting this year as well. I have promised myself that 2019 is the year I publish something for TTRPGs, hopefully several somethings. I have a short side-trek adventure ready for other eyes and playtest, that I hope to publish to DriveThruRPG or DM’s Guild in February. I’ll talk that up more when it’s ready, but as a teaser, check out the snazzy logo for my imprint, Prairie Dragon Press. It’s one of two logos by my pal and local designer Mike Kendrick (@ironcladfolly on the Twitters), and if you haven’t seen his work before I highly recommend it. He also did some poster art for the Pure Speculation Festival, and he is super talented and a joy to work with.

The second logo is for something I soft-launched last year, and am ready to push further this year. The Canadian Library of Roleplaying Games is going to be a bit more public this year. While I will continue to build up from my rather small collection of books, art, and memorabilia, I also want to start on the library’s other purpose, outreach and education. To start that will mean working with local cons and such to set-up displays and demonstrations. But eventually I’d like to expand that to the rest of the province and Western Canada. I’m also building out the Library’s website, including a database of what’s in our collection. So look for more of that in the coming months as well.

And while I’ve threatened to do it for years, I think this year is when I’ll also start podcasting. Between the new publishing imprint and the Library I’ll certainly have enough to talk about. In fact, the podcast will likely be focused on the Library, with occasional updates on other things. There are all sorts of folks I’d like to interview and chat with regarding TTRPG history, specifically Canadian industry history, and I hope that will be of interest to to other gaming nerds.

That’s all the updates I have right now. Monday will have a link to the Rat Hole article when it’s up, and regular service begins this coming week. Welcome to 2019, everyone! May the dice be ever in your favour!

December RPG Blog Carnival: Magical Weather

This month’s RPG Blog Carnival is courtesy of Dice Monkey, all about weather, something that, as I grew up in the Canadian North and currently live on the Canadian Prairies, I am all too familiar with. I try to include weather in my campaigns whenever appropriate, as it can add mood or texture to an encounter which might otherwise be straightforward or dull. In my current home campaign weather is particularly strange, as a magical cataclysm has altered weather patterns and sometimes causes weather events to have strange effects.

Below is a quick list I use in my campaign for strange weather phenomena (doo-doo-de-doo-doo!) on the fly. I don’t use it every time it rains, snows, and so on; the strange becomes commonplace with too much repetition. And while my strange weather comes about as a result of magical contamination, you might have other reasons for weird weather in your campaign. Perhaps a location, item, or being of great magical power is warping the weather around them. Maybe it’s a side effect of the casting or particularly powerful spells (7th level or higher) or rituals. Whatever the reason, feel free to use this list or make up weird weather of your own.

  • Perfectly normal snow is falling (and accumulating) on an otherwise warm but cloudy day. OR, if it’s winter, the snow falling is any other colour but white.
  • Falling rain or snow is invisible, though it becomes visible as it pools or accumulates.
  • High winds make it difficult to walk in any direction, except the direction the wind is blowing from. All movement is considered difficult unless walking directly into the wind.
  • Perfectly normal rain is falling on an otherwise freezing winter’s day, puddling as normal. OR, if it’s not winter, the rain is a random colour.
  • Rain or snow falls as if under the effect of a feather fall spell, basically in slow motion. Creature in the area can move as normal.
  • Pick one character. The wind talks to that character for 1d6+1 hours over the course of the day. You can decide what sort of personality the wind has. No one else can hear the wind except for that character. Note: the wind goes everywhere, so this might be a fun way to impart campaign information to the player, as long as they don’t assume they’re imagining the whole thing.
  • Perfectly normal rainfall, except it rains straight up for 1d6+1 hours. While all other gravity remains normal, rain will puddle on the underside of anything not protected from the rain. When the effect passes, all accumulated rain will fall normally to the ground.
  • An aurora appears for 1d6+1 hours in the middle of an otherwise normal day.
  • Pick one character. That character notices that the clouds seem to take a form relating to whatever they are thinking about at the time. Experimentation will reveal that they can, in fact, make the clouds take whatever shape they think of. This effect lasts for 1d6+1 hours.
  • If spring/summer, the party wakes to find all their water and other liquids frozen as if left out in the cold. If fall/winter, the party discovers all of their liquids to be very warm, as if left in the sun on a hot day. The liquids return to normal temperature within 1d3 hours.

Do you use strange weather in your game? What sort of effects do you use? Drop a note in the comments!