Over at The Rat Hole: #iHunt: The RPG

Heya, gang! I wrote a review of Olivia Hill’s and Filamena Young’s #iHunt: The RPG over at The Rat Hole, up today! Please check it out, and then immediately get a copy of the game your own self. Pro Tip: buy it on Itch, Olivia and Filamena get a bigger piece of each sale over there.

Then feel free to let me know what you thought of the game, in the comments here or at The Rat Hole, or hit me up on Twitter.

My Devilish Good Looks

I’m working on some posts, but wanted to share this wonderful piece from my buddy Jeff Martin (@HEATComic). As part of backing his Hell, Inc Kickstarter I got a Hell, Inc Staff Portrait. Welcome, Devil Brent! Devil Brent (DB for short) runs the office TTRPG, and loves to switch editions on his players, sometimes mid-session.

Goodbye 2019, Hello 2020

Yes, I realize that time is fluid, and that we arbitrarily section it up into manageable chunks in order to make sense of a chaotic universe. I’m actually okay with that, so I want to talk a bit about this past year, and look forward a bit into the next.

I have to admit, the last year was a thoroughly mixed bag for me. On the one hand, it was probably the hardest year for me physically, as I got hit with pneumonia, a bad patch of migraines, and a number of injuries which kept me sidelined. Add in a number of family issues, and all of the things I had planned to do on my personal projects fell by the wayside. Prairie Dragon Press didn’t put much of anything out (though I am proud of The Hedgicorn), and while the Canadian Library of Roleplaying Games added to its collection, I wasn’t able to get that active in the way I had planned. My total time spent gaming was also down, and that’s just bad news at any time.

But then, my freelance editing work really took off in 2019. I worked for a number talented of writers on DM’s Guild and DriveThruRPG, I wound up working on the Uncaged Anthology (I’ve talked about how amazing that is before, so I won’t go into it again), and there are roughly eight to ten TTRPG publications out there with my name tucked into the credits. More than that, I’m proud of the work I’ve done, and I have been fortunate to work with some excellent writers and a stellar Managing Editor/Publisher, Ashley Warren.

I was also busy for half of last year consuming content for the ENnies and working with the judges to come up with a pretty amazing list of nominees. While I do think the awards themselves need some work and changes going into the future, I’m proud of that work as well. There were literally hundreds of strong contenders last year, and out of that we nominated some truly innovative and excellent games. I stepped down because I think there needed someone other than an older white guy in the judges seat, and I am excited to see that coming true with the latest team of judges.

Yeah, a mixed bag. Not great, not awful, it was a bit of a slog but I made it through. Taking time to reflect on the past year and look ahead a bit, I realize that many of the issues which plagued me last year are not there anymore. My doctor and I seemed to have fixed the migraine issues, and apart from a bit of the flu earlier this winter I have generally felt good. Given the changes I have already put in place ( better eating, more activity) I expect to move forward into 2020 feeling better than I have in a while; stronger, higher energy, more physically competent. And if that’s true, I can hope that a lot more things will fall into place for me, because my health has always dictated everything else I choose to do. After all, if I feel like crap, I am less likely to want to sit in front of my computer and write, let alone go to cons or play games with folx.

So assuming my health stays on an upward curve, a few things I plan for 2020:

  • at least four publications from Prairie Dragon Press next year. I have the text of an adventure complete, and I have outlined two other products. At worst I want to hit one project a quarter, but if I can get that to bi-monthly so much the better. This is as much about learning some publishing skills as it is getting some ideas I have had out into the world, so these will be mostly solo projects, not including art commissions and editing.
  • continue working as a freelance editor. I have some work lined up in January, with some “maybe” work in February. Beyond that, I look forward to seeing what I get to work on next.
  • attend more conventions. This shouldn’t be hard, as I attended *checks figures* one gaming con last year. It was fun, and I will be back again this year (to both, IntrigueCon runs a spring and fall con event), but I would like to travel to a convention as well. Big Bad Con is high on my list, and if I can get the funds together in time I’d also like to hit Breakout Con in Toronto in March.
  • start putting up content for the Canadian Library of Roleplaying Games. I really want to start talking about some of the history of gaming, as well as look at a lot of the new stuff coming out on itch and IPR. I’m not certain if this will be blog posts, videos of some kind, or a mix of both. But I want to get those conversations going with folx.
  • play more streamed actual plays. While I squeaked in under the wire and kept my annual average at one streamed game (thanks to Scratticus Academy), I would like to get that up to the dizzying heights of two or even three games over the coming year. Maybe even GM a game on stream for the first time, though I don’t want to push my luck.

That’s a bit of looking forward to the next year. I think it’s all achievable, and I have started working on the specific details to get to each goal. After all, intent is not a plan. So expect a post in the next little while getting into more details about one or more of these goals.

For now, I want to say thank-you. Thank-you for reading my content here or over at The Rat Hole, and for chatting with me on Twitter. Thank-you for the comments and feedback, it has helped me at every turn. Thanks to those of you who picked up a copy of The Hedgicorn, validating my desire to publish and donating some funds to Extra Life.  Thank-you to everyone who hired me to edit their work this year, it was a privilege.

Most of all, thank -you to everyone who works every day to make out hobby and industry more inclusive, and a less-friendly environment for gatekeepers and predators. More than anything, I would love to see 2020 be the year we finally fix the broken stairs instead of walking around them. Thank-you to everyone working to make that happen.

As we pass from one arbitrary year number to the next, I wish you all the best. May your dice always roll interesting.

Playing with William

Yesterday I had the opportunity to play in a streamed game with the Scratticus Academy, and it was a lot of fun! I’m always impressed by Scratticus and the opportunities they provide to folks who might want to dip their toe into playing or running actual plays, but might not know how. It’s a welcoming, safe, inclusive bunch over there, and I highly recommend you check them out.

But today’s post is not about the game, but my character. More specifically, my character’s name, William Lindsay. In answer to a question from one of the many TTRPG related quizzes going around on Twitter, I remember mentioning that I tended to name characters in any modern game I play William Lindsay, after my maternal grandfather, William Edward Lindsay. I said it was my way of honouring the man, but I never really touched on why it was important to me.

First a bit of biography. My grandfather was born in Scotland but came to Canada when the family emigrated to a farm outside Tofield, Alberta. He grew up and went to school, and was something of a polyglot (an understatement; he could read/write/speak English, Scots Gaelic, Latin, Greek, French, Ukrainian, and German, and I heard him speak Russian and Mandarin besides) and bookworm, keeping up on his studies while keeping up on the chores expected of him on the farm.  When the Second World War broke out, he volunteered and because of his farmboy background was assigned as an airman with the RCAF and sent to England to drive supply trucks between airfields. And he would have done that until the end of the war, except someone discovered he could speak fluent German, and they needed German speakers to serve on bombers. He was rushed through flight and wireless training, promoted to Warrant Officer, and spent the rest of the war crouched over the wireless set in bombers. I can’t be certain how many missions he flew, but he once mentioned going up more than eighty times, and I have no reason to doubt him. Most importantly, he came back from his last mission, was mustered out of the RCAF, and returned to Tofield to be a farmer again.

I didn’t learn any of this until later, not that it would have mattered. Grandpa Lindsay was the person almost single handedly responsible for feeding my deep love of books, particularly science fiction and fantasy, and nothing would have made me love him more than that gift.

So that’s part of why I name my modern characters after him, but it isn’t the whole story. I have written before about how I came to TTRPGs, that I started playing D&D in January 1980. Obviously I fell instantly in love with the game! A way for me to play as the characters from my favourite books? Hell yes! And I knew that I wanted to share the game with my grandfather, that he was going to love it as much as I did. As excited as I was to play D&D, I was counting down the days to school’s end, when we would visit the farm for the summer and I could play D&D with my grandfather.

In April of 1980 William Edward Lindsay suffered a debilitating stroke, paralyzing half his body, depriving him of so much of his memories, and leaving him without the ability to speak. While therapy would eventually get a fraction of that back for him, a number of minor strokes throughout the rest of his life would mean he never fully recovered from the first one.

I still tried. But I was eleven. I didn’t understand what had happened to the man who had taught me to ride a horse, who had taught me to love Frodo and Samwise and Merry and Pippin, who I still picture as Gandalf whenever I read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. I didn’t know him anymore, and he couldn’t tell me what was going on.

We never did play D&D together, and I carry the sorrow of that with me to this day.

And that’s why. I never got a chance to play any of these games I love, that I know he would have loved, with Grandfather Lindsay. But every chance I get I name my character after him, so I can carry a little piece of him along with me in the hobby. And if there is an afterlife, maybe he knows that somewhere, and smiles.

So if we ever game together, know there is a good chance my grandfather is gaming with us as well. He’s a great guy, I think you’ll like him.

Some Thoughts on $300 Dice

In celebration of D&D’s 45th anniversary, Wizards of the Coast released a beautiful set of metal dice, featuring a sapphire set in one of the d20. There are some other things that come along with the set; a nice display box, some stats for a Sapphire Dragon, and so on. And there is Clever Marketing™ all over this. They are only releasing 1,974 sets, for instance, in honour of D&D first being published in 1974. The sapphire is not only the 45th anniversary stone, but the 5th anniversary stone, so it also celebrates the anniversary of 5E. I’m not going to link to it, but if you search you can scroll through a whole page of hype before getting to the price at the bottom. Yes, this celebratory set of dice sells for a cool $299.95USD.

Let me be clear right from the start, I have no quibble with WotC partnering with Level Up Dice to create an expensive set of dice for their anniversary. Sometimes game companies are going to create expensive collectibles for our hobby, and that isn’t inherently bad. There are folks who will buy a set of these and enjoy their purchase for years to come. And to forestall any, “You’re just butt hurt because you can’t afford them!” comments, I can afford them. I work a well-paying, full-time job. While dropping $300 on a set of dice wouldn’t be insignificant, I could afford to do it. I’m just not going to.

My issue is that this seems to be the only thing WotC is doing to celebrate either of these milestones. In fact, if I type “celebrate 45 years of D&D” into my search engine, the first two pages of results all relate to the sale of this dice set. I have to get to page three before I see anything else, mostly op-eds regarding, you guessed it, the sale of these dice. But what I don’t see is any word from WotC about celebrating these anniversaries with anyone except the 1,974 people who purchase this set.

As of March of this year, there are an estimated 13.7 million folx playing D&D worldwide. Because large numbers are large, if I subtract 1,974 from 13.7 million, I’m pretty much left with 13.7 million. So WotC Marketing decided the best way to celebrate the anniversaries of both D&D and 5E was to sell an expensive item to a statistically insignificant portion of the millions of players who have made their game popular. To put this into further perspective, dividing 13.7 million by 1,974 means that one in 6,940 of us get to celebrate with WotC. The other 6,939 get to look at the pretty dice (assuming we can close enough to a set) and think warm thoughts, I guess?

What bugs me about this is twofold. First, at a time when the hobby as a whole is working to be ever more inclusive, WotC Marketing decides on a “celebration” driven by FOMO and elitism. Everything about the way they have marketed these dice, from their limited numbers to the “own a piece of history” rhetoric to the price point, makes it seems like WotC only wants to celebrate with the elite, and only after they have forked over their $300 for the party. If you aren’t one of those 1,974 people who can afford a ticket? Well gosh, hope you keep playing! Now here’s a warm slap on the ass, get back in there, champ!

The second thing that bugs me is that I know WotC is actually capable of celebrating an anniversary better than this. I was running in-store games during the 30th anniversary celebration (or 35th? Okay, the old memory is tricky). For that anniversary we received a box of stuff to help us run a special game day. It contained dice, figures, and special anniversary mechanical pencils to hand out to players and DMs, with enough for us to support up to six tables of D&D. The dice weren’t super special, and the mechanical pencil was white plastic with the D&D logo and “30th Anniversary” stamped on the side. I still have it, actually; when it ran out of lead I put it on my shelf so it wouldn’t get beat up in my dice bag anymore.  But the point is, about forty of us got together in a game store one Saturday and celebrated the anniversary of D&D in the best way possible: by playing the game. And it didn’t cost anyone there a dime.

Now, it is possible that WotC Marketing has some sort of community celebration planned, something that will reach out to the majority of the 13.7 million players supporting their game. But if so, all their marketing around this dice set has blocked word of it getting out. It’s also possible that WotC Marketing may pull something together last minute, as a reaction to the somewhat mixed response the dice have received. But that’s all it will be, a reaction, an offering designed to appease rather than celebrate.

As I said before, I won’t be buying a set of these. I hold nothing against anyone who does, because frankly, it’s a beautiful product and Level Up Dice should be proud of the design. For me, though, this dice set isn’t a celebration, however desperately WotC Marketing might frame it as such. Clever marketing around an anniversary? Sure. A celebration? To me, that suggests wanting everyone involved in your success to take part, and this is not that. It’s not even a signpost showing the way to the road that takes you to that.

Instead, I am going to take the $300 I could have spent on these dice and go shopping on Itch.io and DriveThruRPG, picking up some excellent games and supplements from marginalized creators in our hobby. I won’t do that all at once, but I’ll finish up by the end of January. I’ll post here with my purchases so you can see some of the amazing stuff to be found. To me, that seems a better way to use $300 to celebrate my hobby.

Feel free to leave a comment below or track me down on Twitter (@DorklordCanada), I’m happy to hear your thoughts. And if you would like to get yourself or someone you know an adorable Hedgicorn for their 5E game, you can do that on DM’s Guild. All proceeds go to support Extra Life, so not only do you get something fun for your table, but you help out sick kids around the Holidays.

2019 Canadian Netrunner Nationals

Android: Netrunner is a fantastic card game set in a dystopian future, pitting two player against each other in a cyber duel. Published by Fanatasy Flight Games, the game is sadly no longer in print, but player devotion to the game is still high. So high, in fact, that Edmonton will play host to the 2019 Canadian Netrunner Nationals this weekend. And Renaissance Gamer is helping sponsor the event!

The whole thing is being organized by my buddy Josh, and will take place at The Tabletop Cafe all day Saturday, with a Core Experience tournament on the Sunday. You can pre-register for the Nationals at the link above, which will save you a few bucks, or register at the venue. There is no registration fee for the Core Experience tournament on Sunday, though Tabletop Cafe’s usual play fee of $7 for all day still applies.

I haven’t had a chance to play Netrunner as much as I would like, but the times I have I had a blast. For Josh to get to organize the National Tournament is huge, and they have done a great job pulling this together. Both days are going to be super fun, so I encourage you to stop by at some point and check out the tournament, and maybe come by on the Sunday to try it out for yourself. The more we can support these fantastic local events, the more of them we are likely to get, so come cheer folks on!

Extra Life Follow Up

This past weekend I took part in the Extra Life Game Day, playing games for 24 hours with my friends to raise money for sick kids. The Game Day was long, as always, but a whole lot of fun, as always. Despite douchetrumpets trying to crash the site for most of the day, games were still played and donations were still made. I had a goal of $500, and with the help of generous donors I hit $633, so thank you to everyone who donated or spread the word!

But the fundraising isn’t over! I can accept donations until December 31, 2019, so I would love to see that total get to $750, or even $1000, before the year is out. So I am putting together this post so I have all my donation information in one spot for easy linking. You can expect to hear about this a few more times between now and year end.

The best way to donate is through my secure donation page on the Extra Life site. You can donate any amount securely, and if you donate $20 or more you will receive a tax receipt via email almost immediately. Besides a crisp tax receipt, I have a few other incentives for folks who donate:

  • If you donate any amount before the end of the year, I will create a magic or special item for your TTRPG game. You pick the game and give me a one-word prompt, and I’ll come up with a 300-500 word description for this item. DM me on Twitter once you have donated with your game and prompt.
  • If you make a $50+ donation I will edit up to twenty pages of text for you. For every increment of $50 you donate I will edit another twenty pages, and so on. Those pages can be all one project, or split between projects, as you require. The project doesn’t have to be right away, you can lock in my services for a future project if you like. You can also donate to get editing for someone else, so this makes a great gift for the TTRPG or sci-fi/fantasy writer in your life. When you have donated, shoot me an email at brent.jans@gmail.com with “Extra Life Editing” in the title, outlining your project details.

Finally, I created a deadly, adorable creature for my home game, and I shared it on DM’s Guild to raise money for Extra Life. All proceeds from The Hedgicorn go to Extra Life, and you get a unique fey creature for your D&D table. It currently enjoys a five-star rating, and you can read a wonderful review of the creature on the page as well.

So plenty of ways for you to donate, help sick kids, and get some rewards for your generosity. Donations of any amount are appreciated, and if you can’t donate please help spread the word. If I hit my $1000 goal by the end of the year, I plan to release something else on DM’s Guild for free, as a thank you to the community. But we’ll have to get there if you want to see what that is…

Uncaged Anthology Volume Three Is Out!

Just in time for Halloween, Uncaged Anthology Volume Three is ready to bring some spoopy D&D adventures to your table. Like the previous two volumes, Volume Three is packed with exciting new takes on some classic and favourite D&D monsters, ready to grace your game night or con slot. Spearheaded by the amazing Ashley Warren and featuring cover art by Samantha Darcy, this beautiful new volume deserves a spot on your shelf. Maybe face out, so the cover can stare into your soul…

I’ve said it before but I never get tired of repeating it: the Uncaged Anthology series has been an unalloyed joy to work on. The writers and editors I have worked with have been a delight throughout the process. If you ever get a chance to work on a project with Ashley, count yourself a lucky person. The whole Uncaged Anthology project is an immense undertaking, and she has managed it with grace and skill. I am proud to be a small part of this project, and work with and for such stellar individuals.

So Volume Three is on-sale today, in both print and .pdf version. And of course you can also grab Volume One and Volume Two, also in print and .pdf, if you haven’t already done so. The team is hard at work getting Volume Four finished to round out the year, so keep your eyes pealed for that end-of-year treat. And don’t think Uncaged is just going away; there’s another project in the works for 2020 that is simply divine…

And if you are in need of an editor for your TTRPG or SF fiction project, please check out my rate page. I am currently raising funds for Extra Life, and until the end of November you can get twenty pages of editing for a $50 donation to Extra Life. A steal of a deal and it helps sick kids, so what’s not to love? Check out the details on my rate page.

Beyond Lamentations

A little while back I posted my thoughts on the Lamentations of the Flame Princess publication “Zak Has Nothing To Do With This Book”, both here and over at The Rat Hole. It was pretty well received, and of course the usual Zak and Jimmy apologists came out and were blocked, because life is short and I don’t have time for both games and playing whack-a-mole with fools.

Last week, LotFP posted the book for sale on DriveThruRPG, minus the three page “editorial” from Jimmy Raggi Number Four at the back. Apparently Jimmy has the courage of his convictions, as long as his convictions are limited to 500 copies so only a fraction of the industry will read them. And yes, I am aware because Jimmy made sure to say, the full text of the editorial is available in a LotFP fan group on Facebook. Wise to post it where the majority of the folks who will read it already agree with you. Such brave, much courage. By the way, if you’re looking for the book at DriveThru now, it has been re-titled, “An Analysis into the Nature of Man & the Satanic Power He Contains”, because if Jimmy Raggi Number Four is two things, he is cowardly and pretentious.

In any case, I made my feelings know at the time, both on the DriveThruRPG product page and on Twitter. And in the moment, full of righteous fury, I declared I would not buy another thing from DriveThruRPG while that book was on their site. And my tweet took off! It got over a hundred Likes, shared pretty close to that many times. Not huge by some standards, but it had traction, and folks were getting on board with a boycott. When the CEO of DriveThruRPG posted on the product page, saying they would not be removing the book for… *check notes* …reasons, it got even more traction, and more folks were climbing on the boycott bandwagon.

Which sucks, because a boycott was not the answer, and I was a fool for thinking it was.

Let me take a tangent for a moment, that I promise I will loop back. I did volunteer emergency medical response for close to twenty years, starting in my teens. I’m also a trained Emergency Medical Responder. Through all that, I was taught to always think of the victim first, and where possible, listen to the victim. They can often tell you things you need to know in order to deal with their emergency effectively. Also, a patient on scene who is awake and coherent has to give consent to be treated. That issue of consent is huge in the EMS field, and professionals have lost their job for forgetting it.

Back to the present. See, in calling for a boycott of DriveThruRPG in the heat of the moment, I forgot my duty to the victims. After all, who is my boycott going to hurt? Zak can’t sell there any more, so it doesn’t hurt him. Jimmy does sell there, and it would hurt him a little. But his apologists have already driven that book to be an electrum best seller, because garbage people buy in packs, and no one supporting my boycott was likely to have bought it anyway. But there are folks in the industry who have been victimized and hurt by Zak and Jimmy, who still somehow and bravely create for our hobby, who use DriveThruRPG to make a living. And that’s who my righteous little boycott really hurts. To use an analogy I made elsewhere, it’s like I showed up to an accident scene and was more concerned with the car than the pedestrian it hit.

I didn’t come to this realization on my own. Someone else had to point it out, I was just lucky enough to see it, and belatedly smart enough to stop and think it through. So I have to thank @wundergeek and @machineiv, among others, for getting my head back on straight. They didn’t do it for me, but I am glad they and their words were there nonetheless.

By not listening to the victims and what they needed, not only did I cause them harm, I wasted an opportunity to help them. Like I said, my Twitter thread on the whole affair has been read and liked and shared a bunch since I posted it. Traffic to my original article, both here and at The Rat Hole, has jumped to thousands of views. There was excellent discussion going on in a very supportive RPG.net forum thread. I had the attention of a not insignificant portion of the TTRPG hobby for a split second, and I wasted it by calling for a boycott.

What should I have done instead? Taken a moment to check in with the folks victimized by Zak and Jimmy. Find out what they might want or need from this situation. Maybe that’s nothing; they don’t want to get dragged back in, and that’s understandable. But maybe there were ways I could have used this moment to help them, to help the marginalized in the TTRPG community who have always been the targets of the Zak Smiths and the Jimmy Raggi Number Fours.

For instance, as was pointed out, instead of shouting boycott in a crowded thread, I could have instead pointed folks to creators that could actually use the attention. Wundergeek and Machineiv are two of them, but there are so many others I could have shone a light on while passions were high. I’m not saying it would have changed anyone’s life, but even a few more sales for some or all of them would have been a net positive. But I’ll never know, because that’s not what I did.

But it is what I am going to do. If you stuck through and read this far, it won’t surprise you that I am not boycotting DriveThruRPG, and I don’t think you or anyone else should either. Obviously folks have to make up their own minds about that, but for me the path forward is a bit more complicated, and ultimately better. I’m still thinking things through, and listening, and thinking some more. But here are some main points for me going forward:

  • Obviously Lamentations of the Flame Princess will never see a dime from me. The only reason I have anything from them in the first place is because I grab one of everything on FreeRPG Day, and they submitted some stuff for the ENnies last year (It was never in any contention; it was laughably bad when we got it, and it fared worse by comparison as we received better submissions throughout the year).
  • I’m going to be very picky with my DriveThruRPG purchases going forward. While proximity is not guilt, I have made a list of the publishers who appear on the “People Who Purchased This Title Also Bought This” list on the LotFP product pages. It’s possible not all of them are the same level of toolbag as Jimmy Raggi Number Four. But given a choice, I think my money is better spent elsewhere. Update: since a few people seem to think this is some sort of hit list, let me be clearer. This is simply the first step in a process of being more conscious of where my money is going. Yes, there will be several large publishers on the list. Do I think they are all problematic? Of course not, but taking a closer look at them and consciously choosing where my money goes doesn’t hurt. We are past the point where brand loyalty and willful or feigned ignorance of a publisher’s issues should be acceptable.
  • I’m also going to spend more time over at Itch.io and Indie Press Revolution, because DriveThruRPG might be the biggest online distributor, but that doesn’t make them the best. Both those other sites have a really strong concentration of some of the best and brightest in our hobby today, and I plan to make them my first and second stops for games, with DriveThru coming in third. I don’t think I’ll suffer by that.
  • I’m going to be more active in finding those creators who deserve to have more attention paid to their work, checking out their stuff, and picking up the stuff that interests me. More importantly, I’m going to use the platforms I have to promote their work, to make it even a tiny bit easier for other folks to find.
  • I receive royalties from projects on DriveThruRPG and DM’s Guild. Going forward, I’m going to budget so that half my royalties will be spent over at Itch or Indie Press Revolution, to support creators there. Alternately, if a creator has a more direct way of getting their work, that delivers more of the profits to them, I’ll use that.
  • In a similar vein, a quarter of my royalties will go to supporting marginalized creators in other ways, whether that’s Patreon, Kofi, Kickstarter, or direct support though PayPal and the like.

For those last two points, I’m not swearing it will be a bucket of money going out. But it’s easy to say I support marginalized creators in my hobby. Going forward, I want to be deliberate about it, and put my money where it will do some good. If that also means less money for DriveThruRPG (except for what I spend on marginalized creators there), well, maybe they will take that as a sign. Or not, but I can hope.

I understand not everyone can make commitments like that, and I get it. But if you were one of the folks who built the barricade when I shouted boycott, I’d appreciate it if you tried something similar, within your means. Not only will this actively help the folks who would be hurt most by a boycott, but it will ultimately hit Zak and Jimmy where it will hurt the most; in their soft, fleshy egos.

Comments, questions, concerns? Talk to me below or find me on Twitter.